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Alexander Technique Speed Dating — 4 Comments

  1. Pingback: 30 Second Alexander Technique – 1 | Body Learning Blog

  2. For a big live group, (more than fifteen people – the more the better.)Takes about 20 seconds, then you have a few more seconds to explain about the power of habit.
    The following four numbered suggestions all communicate the same phenomena of how strong habitual routines are. Only one needs to be done to make the point. However, doing two of them is interesting in that, even after being “tricked” once, most people in the audience can be “tricked” the second time as well.

    More of what I’d say after two of these four options are used….
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    1. Ask the participants to say Stop! out loud five times in unison. Count to three and lead the participants in doing this. Then ask what do they do when they come to a green light? Most will say “stop” even though the correct answer is “go.”

    2. Ask the participants to say “silk” out loud five times in unison. Count to three and lead the participants in doing this. Ask the group, “What do big cows drink?” Most will say “milk” even though the correct answer is “water.”

    3. Ask the participants to say “ten” out loud five times in unison. Count to three and lead the participants in doing this. Ask them, “What are aluminum cans made of?” Most will say “tin” even though the correct answer is “aluminum.”

    4. Ask the participants to say “joke” out loud five times in unison. Count to three and lead the participants in doing this. Ask them, “What do we call the white of the egg?” Most will say “yolk” even though the correct answer is “the white.” An alternative to this is to have the participants spell “joke,” “folk,” and “poke.” Then ask them what we call the white of the egg.

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    “Why did so many of you get tricked?”
    Because if humans do something more than three times, we are already training a routine that will persist. We’re practicing it. Since what we just practiced is such a simple thing we think we already knew, it doesn’t take much for “Practice Makes Permanent!”
    Now, think about how you have learned to do many things and how often you’ve practiced doing them. The challenge to change an established routine is pretty stiff.
    Alexander Technique shows a way to be free of muscle memory routines. It’s something that takes practice just like playing a musical instrument does – but do you know anything else that can help you not get tricked by your habitual routines?

    • Thanks, D Jane Clappison – Although it’s not as effective in writing. It would be better to film an audience reaction to having it done…which is a bit unbelievable. Everyone thinks, once they see it, that THEY wouldn’t be fooled. But it’s actually a principle of how habits are established. Even if you know about it, it still works on people. That’s why it works a second, third, even a fourth time with an audience.
      I enjoy introducing the power of habit as a first principle – because it shows a need and grabs people’s fascination.
      What might be your way of presenting A.T. to a larger group?

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